About Me

About Me

I’m Bryan Mistele, co-founder, President & CEO of INRIX, a leading provider of real-time transportation information, connected car services and analytics worldwide. INRIX is at the forefront of connecting cars to smarter cities in more than 60 countries around the world.  The company leverages big data analytics to reduce the individual, economic and environmental toll of traffic congestion.

Over the past decade, I’ve served as a member of the Bipartisan Policy Center’s National Transportation Policy Project, as a member of the United States Department of Transportation’s ITS Advisory Committee, and as a board member of the Intelligent Transportation Society of America.  I currently serve on the board of the Discovery Institute, a leading think-tank in the Pacific Northwest.

I grew up in Detroit, spent time in Boston and now live in the Seattle area. I received my Bachelor’s in Computer Engineering at the University of Michigan (go Blue!) and then my MBA at Harvard. I worked at Ford Motor Company and Microsoft prior to starting INRIX.

When I’m not working at INRIX, I’m spending time with my family or boating in the beautiful Pacific Northweset.

  1. Dear Bryan Mistele,
    The 10/20/15 and10/26/15 posts on my blog http://stopeastlinknow.blogspot.com details my “Solutions” to the area’s transportation problems in today’s Seattle Times that earlier persuaded them to convene an Oct 29th Livewire Event “Gridlocked: Driving Solutions to our Region’s Traffic Jams” sponsored by Sound Transit. I urge you to consider the information in them during the forum.
    Sincerely,
    Bill Hirt
    wjhirt@yahoo.com

    Like

  2. Interesting article by you and Tom Alberg in the 2/4/18 Seattle Times. It makes me wonder about the wisdom of spending billions on light rail. I live in Mill Creek and use the bus and light rail to get to Sea-Tac. It takes about 2 hours using 2 buses to get to Westlake and then light rail to Sea-Tac. There are about 10 stops between Westlake and Sea-Tac and it takes about 35 minutes. Sometimes it has to stop at stop lights on MLK Way. This is only marginally better than the bus service was. If we want to solve the area’s transportation problems we have to do much better than that. Spending billions on an obsolete transportation method is not the answer. What you are proposing makes much more sense and will be much cheaper. In fact it can be privately financed. Amazon, Google, Apple, Tesla and companies like that will own thousands of driverless vehicles mostly electric powered. They will form a giant pool of vehicles that anyone can use at any time. The demand for privately owned vehicles will decrease dramatically in turn decreasing the total number of vehicles on the road. Fewer roads and fewer parking places will be needed. Much time will be saved by commuters, much energy in the form of oil will also be saved. My two hour trip to Sea-Tac could be cut to one hour or less in a driverless car. It might be in a vehicle with other people, it might be solo, it might include more than one vehicle, depending on how much I was willing to pay and how fast I wanted to get there.
    I can see that there is much high density housing being built in the greater Seattle area. Parking is at a premium even with single family homes. It is very difficult and costly for a family to have a car for each driver in the household. Driverless cars can provide as much or more mobility(no parking problem) than a privately owned car and probably at a lower price.

    Like

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